Student Research Projects

Wheelock's Math and Science programs encourage students to conduct research and gives them opportunities to present their research at conferences. Here are just a few examples of recent students' work.

Halle Burns and Pablo Tovar at the Undergraduate Biology Research Conference• Undergraduate students Halle E. Burns, Pablo Tovar, Selsebil Sljivo, and Courtney W. Sullivan worked with Department Co-chair Dr. Ellen E. Faszewski on the research project, "Glycoconjugate expression in the immune response of the marine sponge, Microciona prolifera." The goal of the project was "to examine the localization four sugars, β-galactose (Gal), N-Acetyl-Galactosamine (GalNAc), α-L-fucose (Fuc), and N-Acetyl-Glucosamine (GlcNAc), in the process of apoptosis and their corresponding relationship to self-vs-nonself recognition." Read the Report Abstract.

Halle Burns and Pablo Tovar presented their findings at the Undergraduate Biology Research Conference. (Pictured from left: Halle Burns and Pablo Tovar)

"This semester long research project taught me many things that would be useful in my field of study."
- Pablo Tovar, Integrated Sciences Class of 2017

Haley Gaughan Setting Up Temperature Loggers• Undergraduate student Haley Gaughan worked with Dr. Lisa Lobel on the research project, "Too Hot for School: How Urban Campuses Impact the Urban Heat Island Effect." The goal of the project was "to determine if differences in temperature and the other parameters can be detected and therefore if the green space in the park mediates temperature. These data will help us to gain a better understanding of the variations in microclimate." Read the Report Abstract.

Haley presented her findings at the Muddy River Symposium. (Pictured: Haley Gaughan setting up temperature loggers)

 

 

 

• Undergraduate students Kate LaGuattuta and Danny Ly worked with Dr. Lisa Lobel on the research project, "The Impact of Urbanization of the Muddy River." The goal of the project was to "begin the collection of long-term water quality data within the Muddy River in order to assess changes due to the restoration project as well as long-term trends due to climate change." Read the Report Abstract.

Sarah Murphy at Research Conference• Undergraduate student Sarah Murphy worked as a research assistant for two years with Dr. Sam Cook. Her research project, titled "Divergent Definitions of Inquiry-Based Learning in Undergraduate Mathematics," explored a type of math known as inquiry-based learning (IBL). In short, IBL is essentially student-guided learning in which students come to the understanding of mathematical concepts on their own while professors act as guides throughout their learning.

Sarah presented her findings at the Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education Conference in Pittsburgh. (Pictured: Sarah Murphy at the Pittsburgh conference)

"Overall, working as a research assistant, partially in the field of mathematics education, has been an incredibly rewarding opportunity that I have been so fortunate to participate in."
- Sarah Murphy

inspire a world of good

200 Riverway, Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Contact Us | 617-879-2000

© 2017 Wheelock College is a registered trademark.