Summer 2015 Undergraduate Courses

Wheelock is proud to offer several fully online and hybrid courses, as well as a variety of liberal arts and professional undergraduate courses  held on our convenient Boston campus, just steps from the Green Line subway.

How to Register

• Newly Enrolled and Returning Students: Sign up through the Wheelock portal.

• Non-Matriculated Students: Register online (click on Summer Courses link to choose a course) OR Complete our Undergraduate Non-Matriculated Student Registration Form (pdf) and submit it with payment to the Office of Admissions, Wheelock College, 200 The Riverway, Boston, MA 02215.

Tuition Costs: $595.00 per undergraduate credit (e.g. $2,390 for a 4-credit course), plus a $10 registration fee

Course Listings

There are two sessions of undergraduate summer classes, the first session begins May 18 and the second session begins June 30 (though individual course dates may vary).

Summer Session I: May 18-June 29, 2015
 

Course Number and Title
Course Type Instructor Course Description Credits Dates and Times
LSC 153
Human Biology
Hybrid Ellen Faszewski Studies the structure and function of cells and organs within body systems emphasizing mechanisms that allow the body to maintain a balanced metabolism. Topics include nutrition, illness, and current research. Technology use occasional. $25 lab fee required. General Education: Investigations in Science and Technology. For students entering prior to September, 2010: Life Science. Introductory. 4 On-campus dates: 8:30am-1pm, may 18, 20, 22, 27, 29, June 1 and June 3
Online dates: May 19, 21, 26, 28, June 2
HDA 121
Anthropology and Globalization
Online Eric Silverman Introduces the student to the basic outlooks, concepts, and questions of anthropology, focusing on how cultures throughout the world confront globalization, especially societies in the developing world. Course will also study the diversity and similarities of cultures. General Education: Fulfills Perspectives on Diversity. Also fulfills Self & Society OR Ethics & Social Justice. For students entering prior to September, 2010: Social Sciences AND Multicultural. Introductory. 4 May 18-June 29
HDA 266
Anthropology and the Family
Online Eric Silverman Pursues an in-depth inquiry into organizations and functions of families in selected non-Western societies. Focuses on the interaction between life course paths and family strategies for adaptation. Attention is given to caring for children, organizing domestic labor and conveying identities and statuses in foraging societies, farming societies, and market based societies. Prerequisite: HDP 120-121 or HDP 124-125. General Education: Fulfills Perspectives on Diversity. Also fulfills Self & Society OR Historical Perspectives. For students entering prior to September, 2010: Social Sciences AND Multicultural. Intermediate. 4 May 18-June 29
HDA/AST 350
Globalization and Human Rights
Online Akeia Benard Explores the processes and outcomes of globalization and analyzes basic Human Rights literature and its application to the global economy. Students will also discover how their daily actions and interactions impact the lives of others, particularly those in impoverished nations. Prerequisite: HDP 120-121, 122-123 or HDP 124-125, 126-127. General Education: Fulfills Perspectives on Diversity. Also fulfills Self & Society OR Ethics and Social Justice. Advanced. 4 May 18-June 29
HDP 260 HY
[Hybrid] Special Topic: Bullying & Cyberbullying: Incidents, Causes, Prevention 
12 hours on-campus, 12 hours online Petra Hesse Parents and teachers have been concerned about bullying among older elementary and middle school students for the past two decades. Bullying has been implicated in teen suicides and in school shootings. Researchers have studied why some children bully, why others become victims, why bystanders do not help the victims or confront the bullies, and what teachers and parents can do to intervene. In recent years, bullying has moved into cyberspace, and is occurring via e-mail, text messages and social networking sites. Similar to face-to-face bullying has been blamed for teen depression and suicides, and teachers and parents have wondered about their in prevention. In this institute we will review what is known about the incidence, causes, effects and prevention of bullying and cyber-bullying. We will also explore whether bullying and cyber-bullying are similar or different phenomena. Are the characteristics and motives of bullies, victims and bystanders the same in face-to-face contacts and in cyberspace? Are interventions similar of different in personal and in virtual space? The institute participants will gain a solid understanding of current research on bullying and cyber-bullying and of best preventive practices. 2 May 29-May 30
9:00 AM-3:00 PM
HDP 260 HY
[Hybrid]
Special Topic: Children's Emotional Development in Schools and Communities
24 hours on-campus, 12 hours online Petra Hesse and William Sharp This institute has been developed in response to concerns voiced by many teachers and other human service professionals and reports by the Surgeon General, the American Psychological Association and other organizations indicating that 20 to 25% of children in the U.S. suffer from emotional problems, but frequently do not receive any professional help. This institute has been designed to support teachers, parents, and counselors in their efforts to strengthen children's emotional development in schools and communities. 3 June 25-June27 9:00 AM-5:00 PM
HDP 330
Psychology of Race
On-campus Tina Durand Interdisciplinary investigation of the historical, ideological, structural, cultural, and individual manifestations of race and racism in society. Examines how the intersection of race with social class, gender, ethnicity, identity, and sexuality shapes the human experience, and how these factors operate as systems of power and inequality which differentially advantage and disadvantage groups. Gen Education: Perspectives on Diversity AND Ethics & Social Justice. Prerequisites: HDP 120/122. Advanced. 4 Tues/Thurs, 9am-noon, May 18-June 29

 

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Summer Session II: June 30 - August 7, 2015

Course Number and Title
Course Type Instructor Course Description Credits Dates and Times
AST 258 Religion in America Online Eric Silverman Investigates different religious traditions in the United States, past and present, while studying social science theories of religion. Topics include: Why does religion exist; how different religions assimilate or resist citizenship; the tension between "religious freedom" and the "common good"; consumerism and religion; religions in Boston; what does religion do for us that so many Americans are religious; does truth matter, and are there 'fake' religions? Intermediate course. General Education: Fulfills Perspectives on Diversity. Also fulfills Historical Perspectives OR Self & Society. 4 June 30-August 7
HDA 256 Sex and Culture Online Akeia Benard Through the lenses of sociobiological, cultural anthropology, and feminist sociology, students will analyze how culture, endured relationships, social power differences and human physiology shape how we construct sex and sexuality. Intermediate. 4 June 30-August 7
LSC 152 Nutrition Online Ellen Faszewski Introduces metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins and importance of vitamins and minerals in the body from ingestion to utilization. Includes dietary nutritional requirements, nutritional components of foods, balanced diets, analyzing diets, variations in nutritional requirements with aging, and understanding of nutritional issues in health and disease. Moderate use of technology. $25 lab fee required. General Education: Investigations in Science and Technology. For students entering prior to September, 2010: Life Science. Introductory. 4 June 30-August 7
HIS 165 America Through the Civil War Online Ann Blashke Surveys American history from colonial period to end of Reconstruction (1607-1877). Topics include European presence in America, settlement patterns, Revolution, westward expansion, Industrial Revolution, and Civil War. Studies political events in relation to social history. Students work with documents to examine how history is constructed, not simply consumed. General Education: Historical Perspectives AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111). For students entering prior to September, 2010: US History, Civilization, Culture AND Upper Level Writing (after ENG 111). Introductory. 4 June 30-August 7

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